Monthly Archives: February 2017

Preview of Da’at Tevunot 1:18 (# 56 [cont.] – 57)

Preview of Da’at Tevunot 1:18 (# 56 [cont.] – 57)

G-d’s own ways are perfect yet He interacts with us through the relative system of reward and punishment, and still-and-all leads everything toward perfection. We’d thus need to know how all of these elements interact.

The ultimate factor to recall though is that, despite the contradictions indicated above, everything is always and exclusively a product of G-d’s will.

והנה צריך שתדעי כי ההנהגה המתיחסת ממש לאדון ב”ה היא הנהגת השלמות, כי הוא שלם, פועל והולך בשלמותו. ובהיות שכבר סידר ושם החוקים והסדרים למה שיגיע אל הנבראים לפי דרך הטוב ורע, הנה יחשבו תולדות החוקים והמדות ההם כדבר הבא מאליו, לפי מה שנחקק והוכן בכל מדה ומדה:

ואמנם, כל זמן שהנהגת הטוב ורע צריכה לשמש, מפעולת השלמות עצמו ימשכו הפעולות הבאות מחוקי הטוב ורע.; וזה, כי על כל פנים מקור הכל הוא השלמות, ואפילו מה שנעשה לפי הטוב ורע, הוא סיבוב וגלגול שהולך אל נקודת השלמות, אלא שכל זמן העלם היחוד צריך שילכו הדברים כסדר הזה. על כן מן השלמות עצמו ימשכו ממילא הפעולות ההמה, כיון שלפי הרצון והחכמה העליונה אותם הדברים צריכים לצאת ממקור השלמות עצמו כל זמן העלם היחוד. וסוף כל סוף, פרי פעולת השלמות יהיה, החזיר כל הנהגה אליו לגמרי… והרי זה ענין שלישי להבחין בכל מדה ממדותיו ית’, והוא, הימשך תולדות המדה ההיא מכח פעולת השלמות עצמו, והרי זה כמו דבר אמצעי בין השלמות ובין המדה לפי ענינה, והוא מתחלף בכל מדה לפי התחלף ענין המדה, כי לפי ענינה כך היא מתפעלת מן השלמות. ויש להבחין גם באמצעית הזאת ענינה העצמי ודרך העשותו, וכמו שנבאר להלן:

ואמנם עוד יש לנו לדעת, שכל הענינים האלה כולם תלויים רק ברצונו ית’, שאין להם לא מציאות ולא הויה וקיום כלל אלא ברצונו ית’, השולט ביכלתו הבלתי בעלת תכלית, כי הוא אמר ויהי הוא צוה ויעמדו. ועל כן כח רצונו ית’ נודע בכולם, שהוא לבדו המקיימם בכל עניניהם, בכל חלקיהם ופרטיהם, כמו שכל הנבראים עצמם הוא לבדו המקיימם בכל תכונותיהם וכל אשר בהם, שאין להם ולא לשום ענין שבהם מציאות זולתו:

(נז) אמרה הנשמה – זה פשוט אצלי ואין לי ספק בו:

(c) 2017 Rabbi Yaakov Feldman

Feel free to contact me at feldman@torah.org

———————————————————-

Rabbi Feldman’s new annotated translation of Rabbi Yehuda Ashlag’s “Introduction to the Zohar” is available as “The Kabbalah of Self” on Kindle here. His annotated translation of Maimonides’ “Eight Chapters” is available here and his annotated translation of Rabbeinu Yonah’s “The Gates of Repentance” is available here.

He has also translated and commented upon “The Path of the Just” and “The Duties of the Heart” (Jason Aronson Publishers).

Rabbi Feldman also offers two free e-mail classes torah.org entitled “Spiritual Excellence” and “Ramchal” that can be subscribed to.

Da’at Tevunot 1:17 (# 54 – 56 [beg.])

Da’at Tevunot 1:17 (# 54 – 56 [beg.])

1.

There’s something not to be denied about G-d’s interactions with us, and it’s this 1. There are times when He acts in an open and above-board sort of way with us, as when He punishes or rewards us for our deeds, “showing us His hand” if you will and directly responding to our actions, measure for measure.

And then there are times when His actions don’t quite fit that pattern and His reactions aren’t at all straightforward, as when He functions in response to what Ramchal terms His own “profound counsel” 2 — His own plan which aims to lead us all toward the ultimate rectification and sees to it that everything contributes to that end.

In fact, that only stands to reason. After all, haven’t we been taught that “everything done by Heaven is (for the) good” (Berachot 60a); and hasn’t the prophet said, “In that day we will say, ‘I will praise You, G-d; for though You were angry with me, Your anger is turned away and You have comforted me” (Isaiah 12:1)3?

Indeed, we’ll come to understand for ourselves in the end that behind everything that happens in the world lies the fact that G-d will eventually make His ways known to us, that only goodness and blessings will come about despite our travails, that utter goodness will always rise up out of the bad, and that no one will ultimately be rejected as a consequence of his sins so much as “treated” for and cleansed of them, and that everything will be set right. It will become clear that all G-d intended from the first was to rectify things.

2.

It will also become manifest in retrospect that G-d’s ways have always been far more “awesome, and infinitely wide and deep” than we imagined, as Ramchal puts it, and staggeringly beyond our ken. And it will be understood how “even the least significant of His actions is so full of wisdom and depth that it’s impossible to plumb them”.

For, while G-d’s actions “may seem to be straightforward” at times, still-and-all “their contents are (in fact) esoteric” and a by-product of G-d’s occult plan to do good; and they’ve always been rooted in “goodness rather than harm” even if we can’t “see them or understand (them in that light) now”. For, we can only grasp a “drop from the great sea” of His deeds and intentions 4.

We’ll also eventually come to know that even when He chides us and has us suffer trial and tribulation, things are not what they appear to be — it’s all for the good, as G-d only means to rectify us. He isn’t set on rejecting wrongdoers as the notion of “retribution” would seem to indicate. For, as He Himself said, “Have I any pleasure at all when a wrongdoer dies? …; (I’d rather) he repent of his ways and live!” (Ezekiel 18:23).

That’s to say that we’ll sooner or later see through the apparent and peer onto the meant. For, “as soon as G-d enlightens our eyes with insight”, Ramchal says, “we’ll come to understand (in retrospect) through the very things that happened” to us themselves before we became aware all contributed to His goal 5.

So let it be reiterated that whatever happens to us now as a consequence of our bad or good actions is still-and-all rooted in our ultimate perfected state, when “the eyes of the blind will be opened, and the ears of the deaf will be unstopped” (Isaiah 35:5), For we’ll come to see and to understand the truth of G-d’s ways then as we never could before, and we’ll catch sight of the wisdom that runs through them like a rivulet of quicksilver 6.

Footnotes:

1             This chapter returns to 1:15 and reiterates the important idea expressed there that G-d is always tilting the cosmos in the direction of perfection, and that nothing could ever thwart that. But it does underscore another point, which we’ll address below.

The truth be told, there are several instances in Da’at Tevunot, here and there, where Ramchal seems to be redundant. But it’s our contention that he purposefully repeats himself in order to underscore just how vitally important it is for us to grasp the things being said.

But see Klallim Rishonim 7 for other shades of meaning suggested here. They touch on the mystery of the “immanent” versus the “transcendent” lights spoken of by the Kabbalists. Ramchal contends that the imminent lights represent the way things seem to be while the transcendent ones represent things beyond our ken.

2             See 6:1:2 below, Clallei Milchamot Moshe 7, and Breishit Rabbah (Eikev) for use of this unusual and captivating turn of phrase.

3                That is, “In that day”, i.e., in the end, “we will say, ‘I will praise You, G-d; for though You were once angry with me,” I have come to understand that “Your anger is now turned away and You have comforted me instead”.

4                This is Ramchal’s additional stance here, referred to in note 1 above: that not only can’t we understand G-d Himself but that even His actions are frequently unfathomable.

5                That’s to say, we’ll eventually sit stunned assessing it all and say, “Now I understand why this and that (seemingly bad thing) happened to me – it was so that thus and such (good thing) could come about”.

6             Ramchal is careful to point out here in the text, though, that the overwhelming benevolence that we’re to experience will only come our way to the degree that we can handle it — it will not be to the degree that G-d’s own inherent essential benevolence could express itself. That’s to say that even though there’s much more to remark about the stupendous things we’re to experience than we’ve indicated, the point remains that there’s an even more stunning level that can’t even be cited.

Ramchal sets out to encapsulate this chapter at the end which we’ll offer here rather than above to avoid redundancy.

As he puts it, “G-d’s own inherent perfection is utterly unfathomable. But since He wanted to express His benevolence through acts that are in our ambit and not beyond it, He brought about various things that would eventually have us achieve perfection and a state of rectification. This factor underlies all His actions (here) and is their common denominator. Some and only some of this hidden factor can be caught sight of in G-d’s actions themselves when G-d wants us to open our eyes (to the truth of things), but G-d’s awesome and profound wisdom keeps the vast majority of it hidden away and unfathomable.”

(c) 2017 Rabbi Yaakov Feldman

Feel free to contact me at feldman@torah.org

———————————————————-

Rabbi Feldman’s new annotated translation of Rabbi Yehuda Ashlag’s “Introduction to the Zohar” is available as “The Kabbalah of Self” on Kindle here. His annotated translation of Maimonides’ “Eight Chapters” is available here and his annotated translation of Rabbeinu Yonah’s “The Gates of Repentance” is available here.

He has also translated and commented upon “The Path of the Just” and “The Duties of the Heart” (Jason Aronson Publishers).

Rabbi Feldman also offers two free e-mail classes torah.org entitled “Spiritual Excellence” and “Ramchal” that can be subscribed to.

Preview of Da’at Tevunot 1:17 (# 54 – 56 [beg.])

Preview of Da’at Tevunot 1:17 (# 54 – 56 [beg.])

G-d interacts with us both overtly and covertly, but in the end everything is for the good, whether it seems to be or not. And it’s all there to bring about the great rectification.  We’ll understand in retrospect just how everything that happened was for the good (though we won’t and couldn’t understand that utterly so).

(נד) אמר השכל – עוד אודיעך בענין הזה דבר יותר פרטי, והוא – כי ודאי בכל מדה ומדה שהוא ית”ש מודד לנו, נבחין שני ענינים, הנראה והנסתר; דהיינו, הנראה הוא השכר והעונש, למי שנמדדה לו המדה ההיא לפי מה שהיא, הטובה היא אם רעה; והנסתר היא העצה העמוקה הנמצאת תמיד בכל מדותיו, להביא בהן את הבריות לתיקון הכללי. כי כך היא המדה ודאי, שאין לך מעשה קטן או גדול שאין תוכיות כוונתו לתיקון השלם, וכענין שאמרו (ברכות ס, כגירסת ע”י), “כל מאי דעבדין מן שמיא – טב”. והם הם דברי הנביא (ישעיהו יב, א), “ישוב אפך ותנחמני”, כי יודיע דרכיו הקב”ה לעתיד לבא לעיני כל ישראל איך אפילו התוכחות והיסורין לא היו אלא הזמנות לטובה, והכנה ממש לברכה. כי הקב”ה אינו רוצה אלא בתיקון בריאתו, ואינו דוחה הרשעים בשתי ידים; אלא אדרבה, מצרפם בכור להתקן, ולצאת מנוקים מכל סיג. והכוונה זאת אחת היא לו ית’ בכל מעשיו שהוא [עושה] עמנו, להימין ולהשמאיל, וכמו שביארנו לעיל:

ואמנם צריך שתדעי כי כל מעשה ה’ נורא הוא, ורחב ועמוק לאין תכלית, כענין שנאמר (תהלים צב, ו), “מה גדלו מעשיך ה'”; והקטן שבכל מעשיו יש בו כל כך מן החכמה הרבה והעמוקה, שאי אפשר לרדת לעמקה לעולם, והוא ענין הכתוב (תהלים שם), “מאד עמקו מחשבותיך”. והנה עתה אין מעשי ה’ מובנים לנו כלל, אלא שטחיותם הוא הנראה, ותוכיותם האמיתי מסתתר, כי הרי התוך הזה שוה בכולם – שכולם רק טוב ולא רע כלל, וזה אינו נראה ומובן עתה ודאי. אך לעתיד לבא זה לפחות נראה ונשיג – איך היו כולם מסיבות תחבולותיו ית’ עמוקות להטיב לנו באחריתנו. אבל לא נדמה מפני זה שנשיג סוף החכמה הרבה הנכללת במעשים ההם, כי כל מה שישיג אדם אפילו ממעשי הבורא אינו אלא כטפה מן הים הגדול. ועל כן נדע שבהיות שרצה האדון להשקיף בחק טובו שזכרנו על בריותיו, הנה כל המעשים המגיעים לנו עתה על פי דרך השכר ועונש, יש בתוכם מה שאין בברם ודאי – מה שמגלגל ומסבב בטובו תמיד להשלים תיקוננו. ויש בתוך הזה מה שיתגלה לעתיד לבא מיד, שנאמר (ישעיהו לה, ה), “אז תפקחנה עיני עורים”, היא הכונה, המחשבה הנראית וניכרת מתוך המעשים עצמם, שמיד שיאורו עינינו באור הדעה נבינה מן המעשה עצמו אשר נעשה. אמנם, יש ויש ודאי מן החכמה העמוקה במעשים ההם, מה שאינו ניכר ומושג מכחם של המעשים כלל; כי מרוממות החכמה העליונה הוא, שאינה ניכרת אפילו מפעולותיה. וזה וזה אינם אלא מעשי טובו ית’ המשקיף עלינו לטובה, אך תמיד לפי ערכנו, ולא לפי ערכו, וכמו שביארנו; כי אין זה אלא מה שנמשך מחק שלמותו, אבל בעשותו מעשיו רק לפי מה שנוגע לנו:

(נה) אמרה הנשמה – תכלול גם הענין הזה:

(נו) אמר השכל – זה הכלל, שלמותו ית’ מצד עצמו אינו מושג כלל, אך ברצותו לעשות בחק טובו, לפחות באותם המעשים שהם לפי ערכנו, לא יותר, שם עצות וגלגולי הנהגה להביא כל הבריות אל שלמות ותיקון, וזה הנסתר שבכל מעשיו, צד השוה שבהן. ונסתרם זה – קצת מן הקצת ממנו מתגלה וניכר מתוך המעשים עצמם, כשרוצה הקב”ה לפקוח עינינו. אפס רובו עדיין ישאר מרומם ונשגב ולא מושג כלל, מרוב עומק חכמתו ית’ הנפלאה:

(c) 2017 Rabbi Yaakov Feldman

 

Feel free to contact me at feldman@torah.org

———————————————————-

Rabbi Feldman’s new annotated translation of Rabbi Yehuda Ashlag’s “Introduction to the Zohar” is available as “The Kabbalah of Self” on Kindle here. His annotated translation of Maimonides’ “Eight Chapters” is available here and his annotated translation of Rabbeinu Yonah’s “The Gates of Repentance” is available here.

He has also translated and commented upon “The Path of the Just” and “The Duties of the Heart” (Jason Aronson Publishers).

Rabbi Feldman also offers two free e-mail classes torah.org entitled “Spiritual Excellence” and “Ramchal” that can be subscribed to.