Monthly Archives: March 2017

Preview of Da’at Tevunot 1:19 (# 58)

Preview of Da’at Tevunot 1:19 (# 58)

We’re taught that “G-d is the site of the universe while the universe isn’t the site of G-d” (Breishit Rabbah 68:9). But what does that mean? Ramchal contends that it illustrates the point that it’s G-d’s willingness alone that upholds the universe’s very moorings.

As Ramchal made the point early on, we know that only G-d’s existence is imperative. The point here is that everything else exists only because He wants it to. Thus, “G-d is the site of the universe while the universe isn’t the site of G-d” means to say that while G-d Himself needs nothing in the background for Him to exist, the universe simply couldn’t exist without G-d in the background wanting it to exist.

For, He existed before anything else could have, though certain ancient thinkers denied that. But the universe isn’t immortal — G-d had to want to create it, as nothing could exist without that in the background. And let it be reiterated that both G-d’s existence and His utter sovereignty are imperative, nothing else.

(נח) אמר השכל – אפרש לך יותר הקדמתי זאת, ותביני ענין עמוק; וכן תביני מאמרם ז”ל (ב”ר סח, ט), “הוא מקומו של עולם ואין העולם מקומו”:

הנה, אין שום דבר מוכרח המציאות אלא מציאותו ית’, וכל הנמצא זולת זה אין לו מציאות אלא בחפצו ית’, ונמצא תלוי ועומד רק ברצונו ית’. ועל כן נקרא, שכל המציאות המצוי תלוי במאמרו ית’, כענין מה שאמרו במים העליונים (ב”ר ד, ג; תענית י ע”א) וכענין זה אמרו ז”ל (חגיגה יב ע”ב), “הארץ על מה עומדת – על העמודים וכו’, וסערה תלויה בזרועו של הקב”ה”. וכן אמרו עוד (ילק”ש ח”א, תתקסד), “בשר ודם למטה ממשואו, אבל הקב”ה למעלה ממשואו, שנאמר (דברים לג, כז), ומתחת זרועות עולם”. המשילוהו בזה כאילו הוא תומך כל המציאות בכל פרטיו, והוא עומד עליהם מלמעלה:

וכלל והענין הוא הדבר אשר דברתי, שכיון שאין המציאות המחודש ממנו ית’ מוכרח אליו כלל, אם כן הרי הוא נתמך רק על מה שרצונו הפשוט רוצה בו. ותביני מאד שרק רצונו וגזירתו זאת הוא המקום לכל הנמצאים, וזולת זה לא היה מקום כלל. ועל כן הוא ית”ש קדום ודאי, אך אין בריאתו קדומה, ולאפוקי מהמינים שאומרים, כיון שהוא קדום צריך שגם העולם יהיה קדמון. כי עד שלא רצה וגזר בזה, לא היה מקום לנבראים לימצא; אדרבה, לפי מציאותו ית’ אין להם ענין, כי אינם כדבר המוטבע בחוק טבעו של האדם, אלא הוא לבדו ית’ יש לו לימצא בהכרח ולא זולתו, וזה פשוט. אלא ברצותו בהם, וגזר גזירה זאת שימצאו הנמצאים, אז יש להם מקום, ולא בלא זה. ונמצא, שכשגזר בזה – הרי נתן מקום לכל הבנינים שבנה אחר כך:

ועוד תביני, שאף על פי ועכשיו אנו יודעים שהקב”ה שמח על כל מעשיו, והם לכבוד אליו, כענין שנאמר (תהלים קד, לא), “יהי כבוד ה’ לעולם ישמח ה’ במעשיו”, לא נחשוב מפני זה שבזמן שלא היו נמצאים אלה, אם כן היתה חסרה ממנו ית’ שמחה או כבוד ח”ו. אלא כבר אמרנו, האדון ית”ש במציאותו הפשוט – אין מקום לנבראים עמו כלל, כי אינם שייכים בענינו. אבל ברצותו בהם, אז מפני החפץ והרצון הזה נמצאים לו לשמחה, כביכול, ולכבוד. כי ודאי החפץ הזה הוא הנותן מציאות הנמצאים האלה, ונקרא שאינו מושלם, אם אין מציאותם נעשה. והרי זה כמקום העומד ליבנות עליו בנינים, שהוא חלל עד שלא נמלא מן הבנינים ההם. ולא הנבראים לבד, אלא אפילו כל דרכי ההנהגה והחוקים, מיני ההשפעה שזכרנו, שהם לפי ערכנו ולא לפי ערכו, אין להם ענין כלל אלא ברצותו במציאות הנמצאים. על כן רק על פי החפץ הזה חידשם כולם, ואינם מוכרחים בו; אבל גם הם בכלל הבנינים הממלאים את המקום הזה, כי אלו ואלו צריכים להשלמת החפץ הזה, וזה פשוט. והרי ביארנו מה שדי לנו בענין הזה:

(c) 2017 Rabbi Yaakov Feldman

Feel free to contact me at feldman@torah.org

———————————————————-

Rabbi Feldman’s new annotated translation of Rabbi Yehuda Ashlag’s “Introduction to the Zohar” is available as “The Kabbalah of Self” on Kindle here. His annotated translation of Maimonides’ “Eight Chapters” is available here and his annotated translation of Rabbeinu Yonah’s “The Gates of Repentance” is available here.

He has also translated and commented upon “The Path of the Just” and “The Duties of the Heart” (Jason Aronson Publishers).

Rabbi Feldman also offers two free e-mail classes torah.org entitled “Spiritual Excellence” and “Ramchal” that can be subscribed to.

Da’at Tevunot 1:18 (# 56 [cont.] – 57)

Da’at Tevunot 1:18 (# 56 [cont.] – 57)

1.

This needs to be said too, before we come to the end of this first part of Da’at Tevunot. It’s that it’s vitally important to recall that G-d’s own ways are utterly and unfailingly perfect, yet He interacts with us in this imperfect world. How so? — by specifically accommodating His actions to the reality of the reward and punishment system that He established. Indeed, He tailors each of His ways here to the needs and makeup of that system 1.

And G-d’s own perfect ways will continue to accommodate themselves to the reward and punishment system as long as it will go on 2. But at bottom it is perfection that undergirds all of reality — even when the system of reward and punishment is at play, since perfection is what guides and moves everything along 3.

It’s just that as long as G-d’s utter sovereignty lies hidden away as it must for the meanwhile, things will go on the way we’ve thus depicted them for as long as G-d’s wisdom deems that they must. In any event, things will return to the original state of perfection in the end.

And so we’re presented with three components to factor into G-d’s interactions with us: the eventual revelation of His sovereignty, the day to day ethics-based system of reward and punishment, and G-d’s accommodating His perfection to that system. It follows then that we’d need to grasp all three if we’re ever to truly understand things here in the world.

Never forget, though, that it’s G-d’s will that steers all of the above and drives it; and that everything depends on His infinite abilities and will 4, He chose each thing’s makeup and ways, and everything is under His control.

Footnotes:

1                Ramchal doesn’t make this point here but he’s alluding to the fact that even though we can’t really grasp that yet, that’s the reality. For, just as we humans can only perceive the universe through the filters of space, time, and our senses, we can likewise only perceive G-d’s actions through the filter of the reward and punishment system that He set up rather than on their own.

The closest analogy to it – though it’s far from perfect – is the fact that we only understand our parents’ conduct when we’re young by the ways they reward or punish us for our actions, when that really says very little about themselves and their capacities.

                  It’s also fair to say that the fact that the reward and punishment system is the stage upon which the human experience plays itself out now – and will be until G-d’s sovereignty is exhibited — might explain why we often focus more on Divine retribution than on Divine love.

See Clallim Rishonim 6, “Harashimu” which discusses the Kabbalistic notions relevant here (i.e., the rashimu versus the kav), as well as Ibid. 23 “Inyan Hamochin”.

2                That’s to say that much the way that the soul undergirds the body (by keeping it alive, etc.) yet it accommodates itself to the body’s ways (by enabling it to express its physical needs, etc.), G-d’s perfection will continue to undergird the universe yet accommodate itself to the moral needs of society and human interactions as long as it has to (see 2:6 below for a discussion about the relationship between body and soul on this level).

3                See Clallim Rishonim 6, “V’od yesh”.

4                After all isn’t it said that, “The heavens were made by G-d’s word; by the breath of His mouth all their host (were made)” (Psalms 33:6); that “You, G-d, You are the only one. You made the heavens, the highest heavens and all their hosts, the earth and all that is upon it, the seas and all that is in them. You (alone) grant them all life” (Nehemiah 9:6); that we’re to “Lift up (our) eyes on high and see who has created these!” (Isaiah 40:26); and that “It was I (G-d alone) who made the earth and created mankind on it; it was My hands that stretched out the heavens; I commanded all their host” (Isaiah 45:12).

 

(c) 2017 Rabbi Yaakov Feldman

 

Feel free to contact me at feldman@torah.org

———————————————————-

Rabbi Feldman’s new annotated translation of Rabbi Yehuda Ashlag’s “Introduction to the Zohar” is available as “The Kabbalah of Self” on Kindle here. His annotated translation of Maimonides’ “Eight Chapters” is available here and his annotated translation of Rabbeinu Yonah’s “The Gates of Repentance” is available here.

He has also translated and commented upon “The Path of the Just” and “The Duties of the Heart” (Jason Aronson Publishers).

Rabbi Feldman also offers two free e-mail classes torah.org entitled “Spiritual Excellence” and “Ramchal” that can be subscribed to.